Tuesday, October 13, 2009

rainy day discussion topics...

I have two excellent and creepy rainy day subjects to discuss with you today.
The first is Victorian Death Photos, sent to me by Marcus. Please leave work, go home, curl up by the fire (or TBS showing of Home Alone) sip some tea and read THIS. Boy, those Victorians were sure obsessed with death. How fabulous is this quote: "The deceased was commonly represented as though they were peacefully sleeping rather than dead, although at other times the body was posed to look alive."
As you know, this blog should serve as my living will. While no matter what the doctors say, you should never unplug me because I'm definitely still alive in there, if by some horrific turn of events I actually do one day die, please take photos of my dead body as if I'm alive. Eyes open, hands posed in animated expression, surrounded by the living looking somber. Or pose me like this guy, who while dead, is still interested in current events. I bet he's reading the funnies.
Apparently we stopped taking photos of the dead after World War 1 because so many soldiers had died, no one really had the time. The thrill and glamour of death had wained, I guess. Too bad. Anyway, Victorian Death photos. Start Googling and bringing up this forgotten topic with friends and co-workers.
Number two on our creepy itinerary today is all of the bizarre political assassinations that took place from the late 19th century into the 20th century. Part of the glory of my sobriety is that people buy me random presents for no reason. This never, ever happened when I was drunk. Anyway, out of the blue my mother recently handed me a huge coffee table book she saw in a store and bought me. Assassins and Assassinations: History's Most Infamous Plots is, needless to say, awesome. It also points out that killing some leader one disagreed with was de rigueur for the Industrial Age politico. I'm still trying to educate myself on what the hell was up (access to guns, maybe?) so feel free to pontificate via comments or email. I'm just adding political assassinations to my list of interests, which remain focused on serial killers, long term kidnappings, sex crimes and unsolved mysteries.
And while I hate those that discuss good weather with delight and interest, I love all conversation on rain and storms. I find the current conditions glorious...

7 comments:

Natalie said...

If you haven't read Assassination Vacation by Sarah Vowell, I recommend it.

Holly said...

Have you read Wisconsin Death Trip or seen the movie made of it? I think you'd love it. I agree with Natalie also that you'd really like Assassination Vacation.

Anonymous said...

"...hands posed in animated expression..." Like jazz hands?

Anonymous said...

The end of WWI also coincided with the Spanish Flu that killed mainly young adults (20-40) in the millions, possibly adding to the "funerals are no longer amusing" trend.

Fredo said...

This is the political assassination that fascinates me. Hapsburg empress wanders Europe, writing bad poetry and climbing mountains, her son commits murder/suicide, and she is then assassinated randomly by an anarchist that, failing to get access to a prince from the House of Orleans, decides to attack her with a sharpened file as she boards a boat on Lake Geneva.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elisabeth_of_Bavaria

sfmike said...

The Anarchists during the late 19th century and early 20th were the best! They decided that if you were too rich or powerful, you probably deserved to die. And it wasn't just guns, either. Lots of people blowing up real good with bombings.

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